GnomeVFS

GnomeVFS

Development status
dormant

Operating system
Linux, BSD

Platform
GNOME

Type
abstraction layer for files systems

Website
developer.gnome.org/gnome-vfs/

GnomeVFS (short for GNOME Virtual File System) was an abstraction layer of the GNOME platform for the reading, writing and execution of files. Before GNOME 2.22 GnomeVFS was primarily used by the appropriate versions of Nautilus file manager (renamed to GNOME Files) and other GNOME applications.
A cause of confusion is the fact that the file system abstraction used by the Linux kernel is also called the virtual file system (VFS) layer. This is however at a lower level.
Due to perceived shortcomings of GnomeVFS[1] a replacement called GVfs was developed. GVfs is based on GIO and allows partitions to be mounted through FUSE.[2]
With the release of GNOME 2.22 in April 2008, GnomeVFS was declared deprecated in favor of GVfs and GIO, requesting that developers do not use it in new applications.[3]
References[edit]

^ “GnomeVFS shortcomings”. 2006-09-18. 
^ Larsson, Alexander (2007-02-15). “gvfs status report”. 
^ “GNOME 2.22 Release Notes, Section “GVFS and GIO””. 

External links[edit]

Free software portal

GnomeVFS – Filesystem Abstraction library documentation
Writing GnomeVFS Modules

v
t
e

GNOME

Core Applications

Boxes
Calculator
Calendar
Character Map
Dictionary
Disks
Files
Software
Terminal
Videos
Web

Additional Applications

Development

Anjuta
Builder
Glade Interface Designer
Meld
GNOME Devhelp
Nemiver
Geany
Gtranslator

Office

AbiWord
Dia
Gnumeric
Evince
Evolution
Ease
LaTeXila
OCRFeeder

Graphics

Eye of GNOME
F-Spot
GIMP
gThumb
Inkscape
Shotwell
Simple Scan

Internet

Balsa
Empathy
Ekiga
Gobby
SFLphone
Vino (VNC server)
Vinagre
transmission-gtk

Media

Banshee
Cheese
Pitivi
Rhythmbox
Sound Juicer
EasyTag

Games

GNOME Games

Chess
Mines

gbrainy
PyChess

Utilities

Archive Manager
Brasero
dconf-editor
gedit
gnote
GParted
Tomboy

Platform components

User interface

GNOME 3

GDM
Mutter
GNOME Shell
Tango Desktop Project
Orca

GNOME 2

Metacity
GNOME Panel
Clearlooks

Other

Cinnamon
MATE
Diodon
Docky
GNOME Do
Avant Window Navigator

GNOME Base

GTK+

GDK
ATK
Clutter

Pango
GLib

GObject
GIO

IBus

Other

dconf
Genie
Keyring
GNOME-DB
GVfs
Librsvg
Tracker
Vala
libxslt
libxml2

freedes
도신닷컴

Lara Amersey

Lara Amersey

Born
(1984-11-13) November 13, 1984 (age 32)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Occupation
Actress

Years active
2003–present

Lara Amersey (born November 13, 1984) is a Canadian actress. She is known for her roles in Life with Derek, Overruled, Monster Warriors and Land of the Dead.
Life and career[edit]
Lara was born in 1984 and relocated with her family to Toronto, Ontario in 1991. In 2003, Lara got involved in the film industry and got her break in a Stridex commercial. Following that, she appeared in many other commercials including ads for 7Up, Coca Cola and American Express. The following year she landed a role on the hit kids show Radio Free Roscoe which helped to start her career as an actress and is still the series that she is most recognized for. Since then, she has guest starred in shows such as Life with Derek as Lucy, Overruled as Rory Jablonski, as well as short films Hate, Rose, and Red Velvet Girls as well as the feature film Land of the Dead. Her most recent work includes episodes of Warehouse 13 and Flashpoint.
Lara’s most memorable work to date has been her leading role on the television series Monster Warriors. She starred as Vanka, an athletic, aggressive, overpowering girl with an interest in ancient combat and rituals. The series has aired all over the world in many different languages.
Lara has expanded her experience behind the camera working closely with Jordan Entertainment as an Associate Producer. She is eager about what the future holds for her as an actress as well as her future within Jordan Entertainment.
Filmography[edit]

Film

Year
Title
Role
Notes

2005
Hate
Doria
TV film

2005
Rose
Pari
TV film

2005
Land of the Dead
Dead Teenage Girl

2005
Red Velvet Girls
Julia
Short film

2012
Scars
Dana
Short film

Television

Year
Title
Role
Notes

2004
Radio Free Roscoe
Bridgette
3 episodes

2006–2007
Monster Warriors
Vanka
51 episodes

2007
Life with Derek
Lucy
Episode: “Two Timing Derek”

2009
Warehouse 13
Claire
Episode: “Regrets”

2009
Overruled!
Rory Jablonksky
Episode: “Worlds Collide”

2011
Flashpoint
Angela
Episode: “Terror”

External links[edit]

Lara Amersey at the Internet Movie Database

무료야동

Mavericks High Schools

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (January 2012)

Mavericks High Schools is a group of non-profit charter schools in Florida operated by Mavericks in Education, an organization headquartered in West Palm Beach, in Greater Miami.[1] Francis W. “Frank” Biden, the brother of Vice President of the United States Joe Biden, heads the chain.[2]
Schools[edit]
[1] Schools in Greater Miami

Mavericks High of North Miami-Dade County (North Miami Beach)
Mavericks High of South Miami-Dade County (Homestead)
Mavericks High of Central Broward County (Fort Lauderdale)
Mavericks High of North Broward County (Pompano Beach)
Mavericks High of Palm Beach County (Palm Springs)

Schools in Greater Orlando

Mavericks High of Osceola County (Kissimmee)

References[edit]

^ a b “Contacts.” Mavericks High Schools. Retrieved on January 16, 2012. 301 Southern Blvd West Palm Beach, FL 33405″
^ Clary, Mike. “Officials seek source of powder sent to Biden’s brother.” Sun Sentinel. October 2, 2011. Retrieved on January 16, 2012.

External links[edit]

Miami portal
Schools portal

Mavericks High Schools
Marshall, Tom. “NEW CHARTER SCHOOL PROPOSED.” St. Petersburg Times. August 14, 2008. Hernando Times 1.
Rab, Lisa. “Mavericks High Schools Hope to Profit From Education – But at What Cost?” Broward Palm Beach New Times. Thursday December 29, 2011.

This Florida school-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

캔디넷

Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law

The Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law is an open access double blind peer-reviewed journal, published under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
The Journal was launched on 25 October 2011 at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law in Cambridge by its inaugural Editors-in-Chief and Professor James Crawford SC,[1] who called it “a useful complement to Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law [published by Cambridge University Press”, as both fall well within the Cambridge ethos of trying to look into international law from a broad perspective”.[2] The journal is run and edited by students at the University of Cambridge but receives assistance from an Academic Review Board [3] It is the second Journal of the Faculty of Law at the University (the other one being the Cambridge Law Journal [4]) and one of the very few open access double blind peer review journals on international and comparative law. The CJICL is entering its third year of operation in the 2013-14 academic year, with 56 members on its editorial board.
The Journal publishes articles, case notes and book reviews on international law, comparative law, EU law and transnational law in four issues throughout the year (two regular issues, a compendium of conference papers from the CJICL conference and the UK Supreme Court Review – the latter is compiled by the editorial staff of the Journal and analyses the work of the UKSC in the previous judicial year). It also runs an online blog, which publishes short articles on topical international and comparative law issues. The CJICL holds an annual conference on International law.[5]

Contents

1 History
2 CJICL Annual Conference
3 UK Supreme Court Review
4 CJICL Online
5 References
6 External links

History[edit]
Since its establishment in 2011, the journal has published three issues in its first volume, and four issues in the second volume, which addressed a range of topics including international law and dispute settlement, EU Law, human rights and comparative law[6] providing a platform for both young and well-established academics to engage in dialogue with each other through publications in the journal. The journal has a double-blind peer-review process with an academic review board[7] of eminent scholars in the field of International and Comparative Law. In its first two volumes, the journal has published a number of articles by prominent academics, established practitioners and pre-eminent judges
몰카

Lupinus nootkatensis

Lupinus nootkatensis

Nootka lupine growing in Iceland.

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Fabales

Family:
Fabaceae

Subfamily:
Faboideae

Tribe:
Genisteae

Subtribe:
Lupininae

Genus:
Lupinus

Species:
L. nootkatensis

Binomial name

Lupinus nootkatensis
Donn ex Sims

Lupinus nootkatensis, the Nootka lupine,[1] is a perennial plant of the genus Lupinus in the legume family, Fabaceae. It is native to North America. The Nootka lupine grows to 60 cm tall. Late in the 18th century it was first introduced to Europe.[2]

Iceland Nootka Lupin Flower

Iceland Nootka Lupin Flower Fields

The Nootka lupine is common on the west coast of North America, and is one of the species from which the garden hybrids are derived, being valued in Britain and other North-European countries for its tolerance of cool, wet summers. It grows along roadsides, gravel bars, and forest clearings from the Aleutian Islands, southcentral Alaska, and along the Panhandle to B.C. Rigorous self-seeders as they are, lupine can often be seen along roadsides and in open meadows, their bright blueish purple flowers catching ones eye from quite a distance. Their long tap roots make transplanting difficult, so sowing seed is preferable.

Contents

1 Taxonomy
2 Toxicity
3 Reclamation use
4 References
5 Sources

Taxonomy[edit]
The species was first described as Lupinus nootkatensis in 1810 by James Donn in Botanical Magazine, Vol. 32, Page 1311.[3]
On the Plant List the species is divided in two varieties:[4]

Lupinus nootkatensis var. fruticosus Sims
Lupinus nootkatensis var. nootkatensis is the subspecies.

Toxicity[edit]
A member of the Pea family (Fabaceae), lupines form seeds in fuzzy pods that may be attractive to children. The seeds of the lupine can be toxic, though toxins flush through the system quickly and are not cumulative. However, internal use is not advised.[5]
Reclamation use[edit]
In Iceland, the plant was introduced in the first half of the 20th century to combat erosion, speed up land reclamation and help with reforestation. The Nootka lupine has shown itself to be a very effective plant for land reclamation in Iceland. Dense plant cover and soil fertility can be gained within a relatively short time span, where the growth of the lupine is not limited by droughts.[6] The lupine is well suited for reclamation of large, barren areas because of its nitr
주베야

Stade Clermontois BA

Stade Clermontois BA[1]

Founded
1938

League
Nationale masculine 1

Team history
Stade Clermontois Basket Auvergne
(1938-Present)

Based in
Clermont-Ferrand, Auvergne, France

Arena
Maison des Sports (4,630 seats)

Colors
white and red

Head coach
Guillaume Vizade

Website
[1]

Stade Clermontois Basket Auvergne is a basketball club based in Clermont-Ferrand, France that plays in the French third division.
External links[edit]

Official site

References[edit]

^ http://resultats.basketfrance.com/resultat/organisation/246E.html (French)

This article about a basketball team in France is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

도신닷컴

Phenyl salicylate

“Salol” redirects here. Salol may also refer to Salol, Minnesota.

Phenyl salicylate[1]

Names

IUPAC name
Phenyl 2-hydroxybenzoate

Other names
Salol

Identifiers

CAS Number

118-55-8 Y

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

ChEBI
CHEBI:34918 N

ChEMBL
ChEMBL1339216 N

ChemSpider
8058 N

ECHA InfoCard
100.003.873

EC Number
204-259-2

KEGG
C14163 N

MeSH
C026041

PubChem
8361

InChI

InChI=1S/C13H10O3/c14-12-9-5-4-8-11(12)13(15)16-10-6-2-1-3-7-10/h1-9,14H N
Key: ZQBAKBUEJOMQEX-UHFFFAOYSA-N N

InChI=1/C13H10O3/c14-12-9-5-4-8-11(12)13(15)16-10-6-2-1-3-7-10/h1-9,14H
Key: ZQBAKBUEJOMQEX-UHFFFAOYAI

SMILES

O=C(Oc2ccccc2)c1c(O)cccc1

Properties

Chemical formula

C13H10O3

Molar mass
214.22 g/mol

Appearance
White solid

Density
1.25 g/cm3

Melting point
41.5 °C (106.7 °F; 314.6 K)

Boiling point
173 °C (343 °F; 446 K) at 12 mmHg

Solubility in water

1 g/6670 mL

Magnetic susceptibility (χ)

-123.2·10−6 cm3/mol

Refractive index (nD)

1.615[2]

Pharmacology

ATC code

G04BX12 (WHO)

Hazards

Flash point
137.3[2] °C (279.1 °F; 410.4 K)

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

N verify (what is YN ?)

Infobox references

Phenyl salicylate, or salol, is a chemical substance, introduced in 1886 by Marceli Nencki of Basel. It can be created by heating salicylic acid with phenol. Once used in sunscreens, phenyl salicylate is now used in the manufacture of some polymers, lacquers, adhesives, waxes and polishes.[1] It is also used frequently in school laboratory demonstrations on how cooling rates affect crystal size in igneous rocks.
Salol reaction[edit]
In the salol reaction, phenyl salicylate reacts with o-toluidine in 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene at elevated temperatures to the corresponding amide o-Salicylotoluide.[3] Salicylamides are one type of drug.
Medical[edit]
It has been used as an antiseptic[4] based on the antibacterial activity upon hydrolysis in the small intestine.[citation needed]
It acts as a mild analgesic.[5]
References[edit]

^ a b Merck Index, 11th Edition, 7282.
^ a b ChemBK Chemical Database http://www.chembk.com/en/chem/Phenyl%20salicylate
^ Allen, C. F. H.; VanAllan, J. (1946). “SALICYL-o-TOLUIDE” (PDF). Org. Synth. 26: 92. ; Coll. Vol., 3, p. 765 
섹스

Tharon Drake

Tharon Drake

Personal information

Nationality
 United States

Born
(1992-12-19) December 19, 1992 (age 24)
Canyon, Texas, U.S.

Height
6 ft 3 in (191 cm)[1]

Weight
175 lb (79 kg)[1]

Sport

Sport
Swimming

Strokes
Breaststroke, freestyle, individual medley

Medal record

Men’s swimming

Representing  United States

Paralympic Games

2016 Rio
400m Freestyle S11

2016 Rio
100m Breaststroke SB11

IPC World Championships

2015 Glasgow
100 m Breaststroke SB11

2015 Glasgow
400 m Freestyle S11

Tharon Drake is an American swimmer. He is the current U.S. record-holder in S11 class in 50m freestyle, 50m and 100m backstroke, 50m and 100m breaststroke, 200m individual medley (short course); 50m and 100m breaststroke (short course); 50m, 100m and 200m breaststroke (long course).[1] Drake won silver in the 100m breast at the 2015 IPC Swimming World Championship. Drake lost his eyesight following complications from a routine vaccination.[2]
At the 2016 Paralympic Games, Drake won a silver medal in the 400m Freestyle S11.[3][4] Drake’s time in the finals was 4:40.96, behind USA teammate Brad Snyder.[5] Drake also won a silver medal in the 100m breaststroke SB11[6] with a time of 1:11.50.[7]
Swimming career[edit]
Tharon began swimming at the age of 9. He swam on the Hobbs High School and Caprock Swim Team, both in Hobbs, New Mexico. In November 2007, Drake suffered from amnesia that was onset from routine vaccines. It was determined that an existing genetic condition compromised his immune system and his body couldn’t fight off the viruses from the vaccines.[8] Through help of medication, he was able to overcome the amnesia. In February 2008, Drake noticed some changes in his vision, and by June 2008, he was totally blind, without any perception of light.[9]
After graduating high school in 2011, Tharon continued his path in swimming and qualified as an alternate for the 2012 London Paralympics.[10]
See also[edit]

Swimming at the 2016 Summer Paralympics

References[edit]

^ a b c http://www.teamusa.org/para-swimming/athletes/Tharon-Drake
^ http://www.wptz.com/sports/2016-olympics/blind-swimmer-tharon-drake-headed-to-rio/40001690
^ http://poststar.com/sports/olympics/brad-snyder-and-tharon-drake-go—in-men/youtube_cff4c575-d2f2-5006-b0d6-86f532ff79a0.html
^ http://dailyjournalonline.com/sports/olympics/brad-snyder-and-tharon-drake-victory-ceremony-men-s-m/youtube_5429bc26-e66b-59b7-b226-6953ad96
일본야동

Oderwald

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Oderwald is a Samtgemeinde (“collective municipality”) in the district of Wolfenbüttel, in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is situated along the river Oker, approx. 10 km south of Wolfenbüttel. It is named after the Oderwald, a small chain of hills in the municipality. Its seat is in the village Börßum.
The Samtgemeinde Oderwald consists of the following municipalities:

Börßum
Cramme
Dorstadt
Flöthe
Heiningen
Ohrum

Coordinates: 52°04′N 10°35′E / 52.067°N 10.583°E / 52.067; 10.583

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 242267366
GND: 4338022-0

This Wolfenbüttel district location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

원정녀

Andrew Dewhurst

Andrew Dewhurst

Personal information

Born
(1983-09-24) 24 September 1983 (age 33)

International information

National side

Jersey

Source: Cricinfo, 16 July 2015

Andrew Dewhurst (born 24 September 1983) is a cricketer who plays for Jersey.[1] He played in the 2013 ICC World Cricket League Division Six tournament.[2]
References[edit]

^ “Luke Gallichan”. ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 July 2015. 
^ “ICC World Cricket League Division Six, Jersey v Kuwait at St Saviour, Jul 21, 2013”. ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 16 July 2015. 

External links[edit]

Player profile: Andrew Dewhurst from ESPNcricinfo

This biographical article related to Jersey cricket is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

방앗간