List of offshore wind farms in Japan

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries.
This is a list of operational, offshore wind farms in Japan (within the national maritime boundaries).
List[edit]

Wind farm
Prefecture
Wind turbine model
Unit power (MW)
No. of Units
Total (MW)
Commissioning date
Developer
Owner / operator
Coordinates
Notes and references

Setana Wind Farm
Hokkaido Prefecture
Vestas V47
0.6 MW
2
1.2 MW

Close to shore [1]

Sakata Offshore Wind Farm
Yamagata Prefecture
Vestas V80
2.0 MW
8 (3 onshore)
16 MW

[2]

Wind Power Kamisu
Ibaraki Prefecture
Subaru 80
2 MW
7
14 MW

Close to shore, survived exposure to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.[3][4]
[5]

Fukushima Floating Wind Turbine
Fukushima Prefecture

2 MW
1
2 MW
November 2013

[6][7]

See also[edit]

Energy portal
Japan portal

Wind power in Japan
List of wind farms
List of offshore wind farms
Lists of offshore wind farms by country
Wind power

Notes[edit]

^ “Offshore wind farms planned,” Japan Times, May 9, 2010; retrieved 13 Dec 2010; Kawasaki Heavy Industries, “Japan’s First Offshore Wind Power System Delivered to Hokkaido”
^ “Datasheet for Sakata Offshore Wind Farm”. LORC Knowledge. 2011-03-14. Retrieved 2011-07-04. 
^ 4C Offshore site page, accessed 11 February 2011
^ “First domestic open sea wind power plant starts operation,” Denki Shimbun. July 23, 2010.[dead link]
^ Wood, Elisa (2011-05-25). “The Dangers of Energy Generation”. Renewable Energy World. Archived from the original on 2011-06-03. 
^ Elaine Kurtenbach. “Japan starts up offshore wind farm near Fukushima” The Sydney Morning Herald, 12 November 2013. Accessed: 11 November 2013.
^ Fukushima Forward pamphlet

일베야

Capture of Berwick (1318)

See also: Capture of Berwick (1296) and Capture of Berwick (1482)

Capture of Berwick

Part of the First War of Scottish Independence

An 1873 drawing of the siege

Date
April 1318

Location
Berwick-Upon-Tweed

Result
Scottish victory

Belligerents

Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of England

Commanders and leaders

Sir James Douglas
Sir Walter Stewart
Maurice de Berkeley

Strength

Unknown
Unknown

Casualties and losses

Unknown
Unknown

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First War of
Scottish Independence

First Berwick
Dunbar
Lanark
Stirling Bridge
Falkirk
Roslin
Happrew
Stirling Castle
Methven
Dalrigh
Turnberry
Loch Ryan
Glen Trool
Loudoun Hill
Slioch
Inverurie
Buchan
Pass of Brander
Bannockburn
Moiry Pass
Connor
Kells
Skerries
Skaithmuir
Second Berwick
Faughart
Myton
Arbroath Declaration
The Great Raid of 1322
Old Byland
Corbeil Treaty
Stanhope Park
Edinburgh-Northampton Treaty

The Capture of Berwick was an event in the First War of Scottish Independence which took place in April 1318. Sir James Douglas, Lord of Douglas took the town and castle of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English, who had controlled the town since 1296.
Following the decisive Scots victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, the Scots had recovered all their strongholds, with the exception of Berwick. In September 1317, King Robert Bruce attempted a siege of Berwick, which lasted until November before he withdrew.[1] The following April, an English sergeant was bribed to allow a party of Scots to climb the town wall. The raiding party, led by Sir James Douglas, and possibly the Earl of Dunbar, took the town after a fight. The castle was warned when they lost control of their men, who began to plunder and failed to capture the castle. King Robert soon arrived with an army, and after an eleven-week siege, the castle garrison capitulated due to a lack of supplies.[2] The English burgesses were expelled, and King Robert re-established Berwick as a Scottish trading port, installing his son-in-law Walter Stewart as Keeper.[2]
The retaking of Berwick was a significant victory for the Scots. Historian Michael Brown notes that “symbolically, the capture of town and then castle marked the completion of King Robert’s realm and kingship.”[2] However, Berwick would change hands several more times in the years to come, before permanently becoming part of England when the town was captured in 1482.
References[edit]

^ Brown, p.150
^ a b c Brown, p.151

Brown, Michael (2008).
원정녀

Sandringham

Sandringham can refer to:

Places

Sandringham, Norfolk, a village in Norfolk, England
Sandringham House in the aforementioned village, owned by the British Royal Family
Sandringham, New South Wales, a suburb of Sydney, Australia
Sandringham, Victoria, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia

Sandringham railway line, a railway line in Melbourne
Sandringham railway station, a railway station at the end of that line

Electoral district of Sandringham, an electoral district in Victoria, Australia
Sandringham, New Zealand, a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand
Sandringham, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Other

HMS Sandringham, the name of a number of Royal Navy ships
Sandringham Hotel (disambiguation)
Short Sandringham, a civilian version of the Short Sunderland flying boat
Sandringham Time system
Sandringham Company, a military unit of the British Army
Sandringham School, a secondary school in St Albans
Sandringham Zebras, an Australian rules football club based in Melbourne
Sandringham College in Melbourne, Australia

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Sandringham.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

제목없음

Cyclothiazide

Cyclothiazide

Clinical data

ATC code
C03AA09 (WHO)

Legal status

Legal status

℞ (Prescription only)

Identifiers

IUPAC name

3-(bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-yl)-6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide

CAS Number
2259-96-3 Y

PubChem (CID)
2910

IUPHAR/BPS
4167

DrugBank
DB00606 N

ChemSpider
4535011 N

UNII
P71U09G5BW Y

KEGG
D01256 Y

ChEMBL
CHEMBL61593 N

ECHA InfoCard
100.017.146

Chemical and physical data

Formula
C14H16ClN3O4S2

Molar mass
389.88 g/mol

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

SMILES

O=S(=O)(c1c(Cl)cc2c(c1)S(=O)(=O)NC(N2)C4[C@@H]3\C=C/[C@@H](C3)C4)N

InChI

InChI=1S/C14H16ClN3O4S2/c15-10-5-11-13(6-12(10)23(16,19)20)24(21,22)18-14(17-11)9-4-7-1-2-8(9)3-7/h1-2,5-9,14,17-18H,3-4H2,(H2,16,19,20)/t7-,8+,9?,14?/m0/s1 N

Key:BOCUKUHCLICSIY-QJWLJZLASA-N N

 NY (what is this?)  (verify)

Cyclothiazide (Anhydron, Acquirel, Doburil, Fluidil, Renazide, Tensodiural, Valmiran) is a benzothiadiazide (thiazide) diuretic and antihypertensive that was originally introduced in the United States in 1963 by Eli Lilly and was subsequently also marketed in Europe and Japan.[1][2] Related drugs include diazoxide, hydrochlorothiazide, and chlorothiazide.[3]
In 1993, it was discovered that cyclothiazide is a positive allosteric modulator of the AMPA and kainate receptors, capable of reducing or essentially eliminating rapid desensitization of the former receptor, and potentiating AMPA-mediated glutamate currents by as much as 18-fold at the highest concentration tested (100 μM).[3][4][5][6] Additionally, in 2003, cyclothiazide was also found to act as a GABAA receptor negative allosteric modulator, potently inhibiting GABAA-mediated currents.[7] In animals it is a powerful convulsant, robustly enhancing epileptiform activity and inducing seizures, but without producing any apparent neuronal death.[8][9]
Cyclothiazide has been found to act as a non-competitive antagonist of the mGluR1.[10] It is selective for mGluR1 over other metabotropic glutamate receptors.[10]
Synthesis[edit]

Cyclothiazide synthesis:[11] E. Müller, K. Hasspacher, U.S. Patent 3,275,625 (1966 to Boehringer Ingelheim).

References[edit]

^ Swiss Pharmaceutical Society (2000). Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory (Book with CD-ROM). Boca Raton: Medpharm Scientific Publishers. p. 1932. ISBN 3-88763-075-0. 
^ Sittig,
입싸

Ali Gültiken

Ali Gültiken

Personal information

Full name
Ali Kurtulus Gultiken

Date of birth
(1965-06-27) 27 June 1965 (age 51)

Place of birth
Istanbul, Turkey

Playing position
Striker

Club information

Current team

Retired

Number
10

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1984-1995
Beşiktaş JK
262
(91)

1995-1996
Kayserispor
5
(0)

Total

267
(91)

National team‡

1987-1991
Turkey
7
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 01:09, 7 July 2014 (UTC).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 01:09, 7 July 2014 (UTC)

Ali Kurtuluş Gültiken (born 27 June 1965) is a former footballer and a football manager and scout. He is a part of the most famous trio of the Turkish football team Beşiktaş history alongside Metin Tekin and Feyyaz Uçar in early 90’s.

Contents

1 Career

1.1 Playing career
1.2 Post retirement

2 See also
3 External links

Career[edit]
Playing career[edit]
He had begun his career in an amateur Istanbul club Bakırköy Yücespor Kulübü right before his transition to Beşiktaş in 1983. After his training process in youth system, he was promoted the senior squad in 1984/85 season. His usual position was right back whereas, coach of the team at that period Gordon Milne decided to make him play in forward line due to his decisive training mood and his ambition.
Gültiken reached the peak of his football with scoring 30 goals in 38 matches in 1987/88 season in which he had the second place in top scorers ranking after Tanju Çolak of Galatasaray. Thus, he had the 6th place in European Top Scorers Ranking in the same season.
During the 1991/92 season, when Beşiktaş had achieved the title with an undefeated team record, Gültiken scored a crucial goal against Galatasaray on 9 May 1992 before suffering a massive injury. He had a long break from football and he never recovered totally. After he returned to the team, he could not find a regular place in the line-up and eventually he had to leave the club at the age of 30 in 1995.
He joined Kayserispor in 1995 and spent the last season of his professional football career. He played only 5 matches with Kayserispor in 1995–96 season. His testimonial match was between Beşiktaş and İstanbulspor.
Post retirement[edit]
Gültiken had spent his time with investing the textile sector once again which he has had an initial attempt in his beginning time of football career. He created a brand with his name for men
19금

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr.

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr.

Ladew and family circa 1913

Born
(1865-04-10)April 10, 1865
Shokan, New York

Died
February 16, 1940(1940-02-16) (aged 74)
LeRoy Sanitarium
Manhattan, New York City

Education
Columbia University

Known for
Fayerweather & Ladew

Partner(s)
Daniel Burton Fayerweather

Children
Joseph Harvey Ladew, Jr. (April 1904-?)
Oliver Ladew (1906-1979)

Parent(s)
Harvey Smith Ladew I (?-1888)
Rebecca Krom (?-1904)

Relatives
Edward R. Ladew, brother

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr. (April 10, 1865 – February 16, 1940) was one of the largest leather manufacturers in the world with Fayerweather & Ladew, and he was a yachtsman.[1][2]
Biography[edit]
He was born on April 10, 1865 to Rebecca Krom (?-1905) and Harvey Smith Ladew I (?-1888) in Shokan, New York.[3][4][5] He attended Columbia University in 1885 and left the program to join the family run Fayerweather & Ladew in Glen Cove, New York. The company was started by his brother, Edward R. Ladew in 1898.[6] He became a partner in the company on February 1, 1889.[4][7]
On November 27, 1901 he married Jennie Bennett House.[8] They had two children: Joseph Harvey Ladew, Jr. (1905-?) and Oliver Ladew (1906-1979). Ladew died on February 16, 1940 at LeRoy Sanitarium in Manhattan.[2]
Yachts[edit]
He had two yachts, both named Columbia built, the first built by Cramp Shipbuilding launched from Philadelphia on August 23, 1893.[9][10] Turned over to the United States Navy for the Spanish American War in 1898, the yacht was renamed the USS Wasp and was used in the blockade of Cuba. In 1909 the ship began a nine year long loan to the New York Naval Militia.[11] The yacht was brought back into active naval service 7 April 1917 for World War I service and continued in naval service until decommissioned at Norfolk on 1 December 1919.
In 1898 he ordered a new yacht from the Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, New Jersey for $200,000.[12] The second Columbia, constructed in 1899 and delivered 1900, was designed for possible conversion to a naval auxiliary and modeled after the United States Coast Survey steamer Pathfinder that had been built in the same shipyard.[13][14] In 1913 it was briefly impounded by the Japanese at Wakayama.[15][16] That yacht served in World War I as HMCS Stadacona.
Notes[edit]

^ The National cyclopedia of American biography. 1910. When the senior Ladew died in 1888, a brother, J. Harvey Ladew, acquired an interest in the business and became a
밤헌터

Swiftair Bahrain

Swiftair Bahrain

IATA
ICAO
Callsign


SFL

Founded
2008

Ceased operations
2012

Hubs
Bahrain International Airport

Fleet size
1

Parent company
Swiftair

Headquarters
Manama, Bahrain

Website
www.swiftairbahrain.com

Swiftair Bahrain was a cargo airline based in Manama, Bahrain.
Fleet[edit]
The Swiftair Bahrain fleet included the following aircraft (as of 25 April 2012[update]):

Swiftair Bahrain Fleet

Aircraft
Total
Orders
Passengers
(Economy)
Notes

Boeing 727-200F
1
0

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Aviation portal

Official website

v
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Airlines of Bahrain

Schedule

Gulf Air

Cargo

DHL International Aviation ME

Defunct

Bahrain Air
Gulf Aviation
Gulf Traveller
Swiftair Bahrain

This Bahrain-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article relating to an Asian airline is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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19금

Tommy Mason-Griffin

Tommy Mason-Griffin

Free agent

Position
Point guard

Personal information

Born
(1990-09-29) September 29, 1990 (age 26)
Houston, Texas

Nationality
American

Listed height
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)

Listed weight
191 lb (87 kg)

Career information

High school
Madison (Houston, Texas)

College
Oklahoma (2009–2010)

NBA draft
2010 / Undrafted

Playing career
2010–present

Career history

2010–2011
Sioux Falls Skyforce

2011–2012
2014–2015
ratiopharm Ulm

2016
Donar Groningen

Career highlights and awards

Third-team All-Big 12 (2010)
Big 12 All-Rookie Team (2010)
McDonald’s All-American (2009)

Thomas “Tommy” Mason-Griffin (born September 29, 1990) is an American professional basketball player who last played for Donar Groningen of the Dutch Basketball League (DBL).[1] Mason-Griffin usually plays as point guard. He played college basketball for the Oklahoma Sooners.

Contents

1 Professional career

1.1 ratiopharm Ulm (2011–2015)
1.2 Donar (2016)

2 References

Professional career[edit]
ratiopharm Ulm (2011–2015)[edit]
He signed with the German team ratiopharm Ulm for the 2011–2012 season. Due to injuries, he missed the complete 2012–13 season.[2] Mason-Griffin wouldn’t play in the 2013–14 season as well. For the 2014–15 season, he returned to ratiopharm Ulm, and played 10 BBL games that season.[3]
Donar (2016)[edit]
On December 15, 2015, Mason-Griffin signed with Donar Groningen in the Netherlands.[4] On January 11, 2016, Donar and Mason-Griffin parted ways.[5] He played one game for Donar, in which he had 8 points and 6 assists.
On October 30, 2016, Mason-Griffin was selected by the Maine Red Claws with the 108th pick of the 2016 NBA Development League draft,[6] but was waived on November 9.[7]
References[edit]

^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin”. RealGM. 
^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin”. Basketball Ulm. 
^ “Tommy Mason-griffin profile”. FIBA.com. 
^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin volgt Ken Brown op bij Donar”. Basketball.nl. 
^ [1]
^ Boston, Evans (October 30, 2016). “2016 NBA D-League Draft Results”. NBA.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016. 
^ Boston, Evans (November 9, 2016). “Training Camp Cuts”. NBA.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016. 

This biographical article relating to a United States basketball player, coach, or other figure born in the 1990s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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한국야동

Electrochimica Acta

Electrochimica Acta  

Abbreviated title (ISO 4)

Electrochim. Acta

Discipline
Electrochemistry

Language
English

Edited by
Robert Hillman

Publication details

Publisher

Elsevier (England)

Publication history

1959-present

Frequency
Biweekly

Impact factor
(2014)

4.504

Indexing

ISSN
0013-4686

Links

Journal homepage
Online access

Electrochimica Acta is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of electrochemistry. It is the official publication of the International Society of Electrochemistry and it is published bimonthly. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2013 impact factor of 4.086.[1] The current editor-in-chief is A.R.Hillman (University of Leicester).[2]
References[edit]

^ “Electrochimica Acta”. 2013 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2014. 
^ “Electrochimica Acta”. Official website. Elsevier. Retrieved 2011-07-27. 

External links[edit]

Official website

야플티비

László Vajda

László Vajda may refer to:

Ladislao Vajda, Hungarian director
Ladislaus Vajda, Hungarian screenwriter
László Vajda (figure skater), Hungarian figure skater

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

뉴야넷