GnomeVFS

GnomeVFS

Development status
dormant

Operating system
Linux, BSD

Platform
GNOME

Type
abstraction layer for files systems

Website
developer.gnome.org/gnome-vfs/

GnomeVFS (short for GNOME Virtual File System) was an abstraction layer of the GNOME platform for the reading, writing and execution of files. Before GNOME 2.22 GnomeVFS was primarily used by the appropriate versions of Nautilus file manager (renamed to GNOME Files) and other GNOME applications.
A cause of confusion is the fact that the file system abstraction used by the Linux kernel is also called the virtual file system (VFS) layer. This is however at a lower level.
Due to perceived shortcomings of GnomeVFS[1] a replacement called GVfs was developed. GVfs is based on GIO and allows partitions to be mounted through FUSE.[2]
With the release of GNOME 2.22 in April 2008, GnomeVFS was declared deprecated in favor of GVfs and GIO, requesting that developers do not use it in new applications.[3]
References[edit]

^ “GnomeVFS shortcomings”. 2006-09-18. 
^ Larsson, Alexander (2007-02-15). “gvfs status report”. 
^ “GNOME 2.22 Release Notes, Section “GVFS and GIO””. 

External links[edit]

Free software portal

GnomeVFS – Filesystem Abstraction library documentation
Writing GnomeVFS Modules

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GNOME

Core Applications

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도신닷컴

Phenyl salicylate

“Salol” redirects here. Salol may also refer to Salol, Minnesota.

Phenyl salicylate[1]

Names

IUPAC name
Phenyl 2-hydroxybenzoate

Other names
Salol

Identifiers

CAS Number

118-55-8 Y

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

ChEBI
CHEBI:34918 N

ChEMBL
ChEMBL1339216 N

ChemSpider
8058 N

ECHA InfoCard
100.003.873

EC Number
204-259-2

KEGG
C14163 N

MeSH
C026041

PubChem
8361

InChI

InChI=1S/C13H10O3/c14-12-9-5-4-8-11(12)13(15)16-10-6-2-1-3-7-10/h1-9,14H N
Key: ZQBAKBUEJOMQEX-UHFFFAOYSA-N N

InChI=1/C13H10O3/c14-12-9-5-4-8-11(12)13(15)16-10-6-2-1-3-7-10/h1-9,14H
Key: ZQBAKBUEJOMQEX-UHFFFAOYAI

SMILES

O=C(Oc2ccccc2)c1c(O)cccc1

Properties

Chemical formula

C13H10O3

Molar mass
214.22 g/mol

Appearance
White solid

Density
1.25 g/cm3

Melting point
41.5 °C (106.7 °F; 314.6 K)

Boiling point
173 °C (343 °F; 446 K) at 12 mmHg

Solubility in water

1 g/6670 mL

Magnetic susceptibility (χ)

-123.2·10−6 cm3/mol

Refractive index (nD)

1.615[2]

Pharmacology

ATC code

G04BX12 (WHO)

Hazards

Flash point
137.3[2] °C (279.1 °F; 410.4 K)

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

N verify (what is YN ?)

Infobox references

Phenyl salicylate, or salol, is a chemical substance, introduced in 1886 by Marceli Nencki of Basel. It can be created by heating salicylic acid with phenol. Once used in sunscreens, phenyl salicylate is now used in the manufacture of some polymers, lacquers, adhesives, waxes and polishes.[1] It is also used frequently in school laboratory demonstrations on how cooling rates affect crystal size in igneous rocks.
Salol reaction[edit]
In the salol reaction, phenyl salicylate reacts with o-toluidine in 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene at elevated temperatures to the corresponding amide o-Salicylotoluide.[3] Salicylamides are one type of drug.
Medical[edit]
It has been used as an antiseptic[4] based on the antibacterial activity upon hydrolysis in the small intestine.[citation needed]
It acts as a mild analgesic.[5]
References[edit]

^ a b Merck Index, 11th Edition, 7282.
^ a b ChemBK Chemical Database http://www.chembk.com/en/chem/Phenyl%20salicylate
^ Allen, C. F. H.; VanAllan, J. (1946). “SALICYL-o-TOLUIDE” (PDF). Org. Synth. 26: 92. ; Coll. Vol., 3, p. 765 
섹스

Ali Gültiken

Ali Gültiken

Personal information

Full name
Ali Kurtulus Gultiken

Date of birth
(1965-06-27) 27 June 1965 (age 51)

Place of birth
Istanbul, Turkey

Playing position
Striker

Club information

Current team

Retired

Number
10

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1984-1995
Beşiktaş JK
262
(91)

1995-1996
Kayserispor
5
(0)

Total

267
(91)

National team‡

1987-1991
Turkey
7
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 01:09, 7 July 2014 (UTC).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 01:09, 7 July 2014 (UTC)

Ali Kurtuluş Gültiken (born 27 June 1965) is a former footballer and a football manager and scout. He is a part of the most famous trio of the Turkish football team Beşiktaş history alongside Metin Tekin and Feyyaz Uçar in early 90’s.

Contents

1 Career

1.1 Playing career
1.2 Post retirement

2 See also
3 External links

Career[edit]
Playing career[edit]
He had begun his career in an amateur Istanbul club Bakırköy Yücespor Kulübü right before his transition to Beşiktaş in 1983. After his training process in youth system, he was promoted the senior squad in 1984/85 season. His usual position was right back whereas, coach of the team at that period Gordon Milne decided to make him play in forward line due to his decisive training mood and his ambition.
Gültiken reached the peak of his football with scoring 30 goals in 38 matches in 1987/88 season in which he had the second place in top scorers ranking after Tanju Çolak of Galatasaray. Thus, he had the 6th place in European Top Scorers Ranking in the same season.
During the 1991/92 season, when Beşiktaş had achieved the title with an undefeated team record, Gültiken scored a crucial goal against Galatasaray on 9 May 1992 before suffering a massive injury. He had a long break from football and he never recovered totally. After he returned to the team, he could not find a regular place in the line-up and eventually he had to leave the club at the age of 30 in 1995.
He joined Kayserispor in 1995 and spent the last season of his professional football career. He played only 5 matches with Kayserispor in 1995–96 season. His testimonial match was between Beşiktaş and İstanbulspor.
Post retirement[edit]
Gültiken had spent his time with investing the textile sector once again which he has had an initial attempt in his beginning time of football career. He created a brand with his name for men
19금

Electrochimica Acta

Electrochimica Acta  

Abbreviated title (ISO 4)

Electrochim. Acta

Discipline
Electrochemistry

Language
English

Edited by
Robert Hillman

Publication details

Publisher

Elsevier (England)

Publication history

1959-present

Frequency
Biweekly

Impact factor
(2014)

4.504

Indexing

ISSN
0013-4686

Links

Journal homepage
Online access

Electrochimica Acta is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of electrochemistry. It is the official publication of the International Society of Electrochemistry and it is published bimonthly. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2013 impact factor of 4.086.[1] The current editor-in-chief is A.R.Hillman (University of Leicester).[2]
References[edit]

^ “Electrochimica Acta”. 2013 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2014. 
^ “Electrochimica Acta”. Official website. Elsevier. Retrieved 2011-07-27. 

External links[edit]

Official website

야플티비

Mary E. Moss Academy

Mary E. Moss Academy

Address

45 Community Place
Crownsville, Maryland

Coordinates
39°1′36″N 76°36′17″W / 39.02667°N 76.60472°W / 39.02667; -76.60472Coordinates: 39°1′36″N 76°36′17″W / 39.02667°N 76.60472°W / 39.02667; -76.60472

Information

School type
Other/alternative school

School district
Anne Arundel County Public Schools

Principal
Wendy Slaughter

Grades
9–10

Website
School website

Mary E. Moss Academy is a public, alternative education program serving 9th and 10th grade students residing in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.[1] Most Mary Moss students attend the school at student or parent request, or after extended suspension or expulsion.[2]
Location[edit]
Mary E. Moss Academy is located on the grounds of the former Crownsville Hospital, just off Rt. 178/Generals Hwy.[3]
PBIS[edit]
PBIS – or “Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports”[4] – is a school wide program that promotes positive behavior and academic improvement through targeted strategies. Mary E. Moss Academy has been a PBIS school since 2003. Students earn “MEMA” dollars for demonstrating respect for themselves, learning, others and property. They use the MEMAs they have earned to make purchases at the MEMA store once a week.[5]
References[edit]

^ “Welcome to Mary Moss Academy”. Mary E. Moss Academy. Anne Arundel County Public Schools. August 19, 2013. 
^ “Referral Process”. Mary E. Moss Academy. Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 
^ “Directions to Mary E Moss Academy”. Mary E. Moss Academy. Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 
^ “Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)”. Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 
^ “PBIS”. Mary E. Moss Academy. Anne Arundel County Public Schools. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 

입싸

Peter Marlow (athlete)

This article is about the race walker. For the photographer, see Peter Marlow (photographer).
Peter Marlow (born 20 April 1941) is a British racewalker who competed at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, finishing 17th in the 20 km walk. He was born in London.[1]
He has been chief judge for racewalking at the Olympic Games in 2008, 2004 and 2000 and at other major international championships. He was elected president of the Race Walking Association in 2003.[2] He was also a former editor of the magazine Race Walking Record for three years.
Personal bests[edit]

Event
Time
Date

20 km walk
1:29:49
1974

References[edit]

^ http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/athletes/ma/peter-marlow-1.html
^ “RWA Past Officers”. Archived from the original on 2012-09-08. [dead link]

This biographical article relating to British athletics is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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춘자넷

Big Bill Neidjie

This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (August 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Big Bill Neidjie (c. 1920 – 23 May 2002) was the last surviving speaker of the Gaagudju language, an indigenous language from northern Kakadu after which the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park is named. He was a senior elder of Kakadu National Park and a traditional owner of the Bunitj estate in northern Kakadu, perhaps the most spectacular National Park in Australia. His decision to open up this land to other people was instrumental in the creation of Kakadu National Park. He was usually called Big Bill Neidjie because of his physique and physical strength, probably gained through his time working on the luggers, and was also called Kakadu Man, after the title of his first book.
He was born at Alawanydajawany on the East Alligator River around 1920 into the Bunitj clan of the Gagudju people. His father was Nadampala and his mother was Lucy Wirlmaka, from the Ulbuk clan of the Amurdak people. He grew up leading a traditional lifestyle in the East Alligator region, and was taught by his father, his grandfather, and others how to hunt and manage his environment. From about the age of 20 he worked first with buffalo hunters, then at a timber mill, and then on board a lugger transporting people and goods along the North Coast of the Northern Territory and to remote island communities. He was initiated at a ceremony at Ubirr in the early 1940s. During the Second World War he helped in the defence of Australia, working at the radar station at Cape Don. He was in Darwin during the Japanese bombings in 1942 and helped Aboriginal people during and after the devastation.
Big Bill was instrumental in the decision to lease his traditional lands to the Commonwealth of Australia so that it could be managed as a wild area and as a resource to be shared by all Australians. After helping establish Kakadu as a National Park in 1979, he returned there to commit the rest of his life to supporting the joint management of the Park. Kakadu continues to be governed by a board with a majority of indigenous Australians. In 1988, Kakadu was featured in the February issue of The National Geographic Magazine, and was the focus of the National Geographic television documentary entitled
제목없음

Frederick Slocum

Frederick Slocum (February 6, 1873 – December 4, 1944) was an American astronomer.[1]
He was born in Fairhaven, Massachusetts to Frederick and Lydia Ann Jones Slocum. His father was a whaling ship captain, and Frederick spent much of his youth mastering boat handling. He enrolled at Brown University in 1891, and was awarded his A.B. in 1895 and a Ph.D. in 1898.[2] He joined the staff of Brown University as a mathematics instructor, then became an assistant professor of astronomy in 1900 under the influence of Professor Winslow Upton.[3] Frederick Slocum took a leave of absence 1908–9 to study at the Royal Astronomical Observatory in Potsdam, Germany.[4] He joined Yerkes Observatory in 1909 as an assistant, and remained there until 1911. He assisted Samuel A. Mitchell in research with parallax measurement techniques, and these were published in 1913.
In 1914 he became the first professor of astronomy at Wesleyan University, where he planned and supervised the construction of the Van Vleck Observatory.[4] He became director of the observatory in 1915, and held this post until 1944. During World War I, he was absent while training merchant captains in the skill of navigation at the United States Shipping Board. He also spent some time at Brown University as professor in charge of the Department of Naval Science, before returning.[4] He retired from Wesleyan in failing health on November 1, 1944.[2]
He was a member of the American Astronomical Society and would join the Committee on Stellar Parallaxes. Their work would eventually result in the “Yale Parallax Catalogue”. He served as a vice president of the society from 1935–1937.[5] In 1934 he served as Vice-President of Section D in the American Association for the Advancement of Science.[3]
He married Carrie E. Tripp in 1899, and the couple remained together until her death in 1942.[2] He was survived by his brother, Edward M. Slocum.[3]
Awards and honors[edit]

Awarded an honorary doctorate of science from Brown in 1938.[4]
Elected fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of London, England,[4] on November 10, 1911.[6]
Member of the Société Astronomique de France and the Astronomische Gesellschaft.[4]
Member of the National Research Council, 1934–37.[3]
The crater Slocum on the Moon is named after him.[7]

References[edit]

^ Marché, II, Jordan D. (2007). “Slocum, Frederick”. In Hockey, Thomas; et al. Biographical dictionary of astronomers. vol. II, M-Z. Springer. p. 1066. 
^ a b c Ste
미소넷

Planet of the Apes (comics)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Planet of the Apes comics are tie-ins to the Planet of the Apes media franchise. They have been released by several publishers over the years and include tie-ins and spin-offs.

Contents

1 Publishers

1.1 Japanese comics (manga)
1.2 Gold Key Comics
1.3 Marvel Comics
1.4 Power Records
1.5 Chad Valley
1.6 Brown Watson Books
1.7 Editorial Mo.Pa.Sa.
1.8 Hungarian comic
1.9 Malibu Publishing/Adventure Comics
1.10 Filipino parody
1.11 Dark Horse Comics
1.12 Mr. Comics
1.13 BOOM! Studios

1.13.1 Classic continuity
1.13.2 Reboot continuity

2 Compilations
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Publishers[edit]
Japanese comics (manga)[edit]
There are two manga adaptations of the first film, both entitled Saru no Wakusei (lit. “Planet of Monkeys”). The first was written and drawn by Jôji Enami and published in the manga magazine Bessatsu Bôken’Ô in April 1968. The second was drawn by Minoru Kuroda and published in the manga Tengoku Zôkan in June 1971. Battle for the Planet of the Apes (最後の猿の惑星 – Saigo no Saru no Wakusei, “Battle on the Planet of Monkeys”, in Japanese) was also adapted into a manga by Mitsuru Sugaya, and published in a 1973 special issue of the magazine Weekly Shōnen Champion.[1]
Gold Key Comics[edit]
Gold Key Comics produced an adaptation of the second film in 1970. That was the first Western comics publication in the Planet of the Apes franchise.[2]
Marvel Comics[edit]
Marvel Comics released a number of titles, the longest-lived being Planet of the Apes (published under the Marvel imprint Curtis Magazines), which appeared in black-and-white magazine format, and ran for twenty-nine issues from 1974 to 1977.[3] Besides adaptations of all five movies, the magazine featured original Apes stories, with writing from Doug Moench and Gerry Conway and art from Mike Esposito, Mike Ploog, George Tuska, and many others. Articles about the making of both the movie series and the later Planet of the Apes television series were also a mainstay.
In 1975, Adventures on the Planet of the Apes offered color versions of the adaptations of the first two films in five or six issue arcs, for total of 11 issues.[4] It was written by Doug Moench.
The stories from the U.S. magazine were edi
우리넷

1936 Miyagi earthquake

1936 Miyagi earthquake

Date
November 3, 1936

Origin time
05:45

Magnitude
7.2 Ms

Depth
61 km

Epicenter
38°12′N 142°06′E / 38.2°N 142.1°E / 38.2; 142.1

Areas affected
Japan

Tsunami
Yes

The 1936 Miyagi earthquake occurred on November 3 at 05:45 local time with a magnitude Ms 7.2, or Mjma 7.4.[1][2] The epicenter was located off the Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. Four people were injured. Building damage was reported.[3] In Isobe (磯部) village, nowadays part of Sōma, Fukushima, a small market building collapsed.[4] A tsunami was recorded.[5]
This was one of the recurring interplate earthquakes at the offshore Miyagi with a recurrence interval of about 37 years.[6] Although not officially named by the Japanese Meteorological Agency, in Japanese, this earthquake is commonly known as 1936年宮城県沖地震 (Sen-kyūhyaku-sanjūroku-nen Miyagi-ken-oki Jishin) or 1936年金華山沖地震 (Sen-kyūhyaku-sanjūroku-nen Kinkasan-oki Jishin).[7]
See also[edit]

List of earthquakes in 1936
List of earthquakes in Japan

References[edit]

^ http://repository.dl.itc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/2261/13019/1/ji0633003.pdf
^ p10
^ http://friuli-as.eng.hokudai.ac.jp/HOKUSHINKEN/PROCEEDINGS/20021210/3.PDF
^ 昭和11 年11 月3 日金華山沖合地震被害調査報告 by 高山威雄
^ “Title Unknown” (PDF). Archived from the original on 2012-03-01. Retrieved 2012-02-25. 
^ http://wwwsoc.nii.ac.jp/jepsjmo/cd-rom/2003cd-rom/pdf/s069/s069-p003.pdf
^ http://www.bousai.go.jp/jishin/nihonkaikou/2/1_P13_21a.pdf

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Earthquakes in Japan

Historical

869 Sanriku
1293 Kamakura
1498 Nankai
1605 Nankai
1611 Sanriku
1703 Genroku
1707 Hōei
1771 Great Yaeyama
1792 Unzen
1854 Nankai
1854 Tōkai
1855 Edo
1858 Hietsu
1889 Kumamoto
1891 Mino–Owari
1894 Tokyo
1896 Sanriku

20th century

1911 Kikai Island
1923 Great Kantō
1927 Kita Tango
1930 North Izu
1933 Sanriku
1936 Miyagi
1943 Tottori
1944 Tōnankai
1945 Mikawa
1946 Nankai
1948 Fukui
1952 Hokkaido
1963 Kuril Islands
1964 Niigata
1968 Hyūga-nada
1968 Tokachi
1974 Izu Peninsula
1978 Miyagi
1983 Sea of Japan
1984 Otaki
1993 Hokkaidō
1994 offshore Sanriku
1995 Hanshin
1998 Ryukyu Islands
2000 Tottori

21st century

2001 Geiyo
2003 Hokkaidō
2004 Chūetsu
2005 Fukuoka
2005 Miyagi
2006 Kuril Islands
2007 Chūetsu
2007 Kuril Islands
2007 Noto
2008 Iwate–Miyagi
2009 Izu Islands
2009 Shizuoka
2010 Bonin Islands
2011 Tōhoku
April 2011 Fukushima
Apri
써니넷