Lara Amersey

Lara Amersey

Born
(1984-11-13) November 13, 1984 (age 32)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Occupation
Actress

Years active
2003–present

Lara Amersey (born November 13, 1984) is a Canadian actress. She is known for her roles in Life with Derek, Overruled, Monster Warriors and Land of the Dead.
Life and career[edit]
Lara was born in 1984 and relocated with her family to Toronto, Ontario in 1991. In 2003, Lara got involved in the film industry and got her break in a Stridex commercial. Following that, she appeared in many other commercials including ads for 7Up, Coca Cola and American Express. The following year she landed a role on the hit kids show Radio Free Roscoe which helped to start her career as an actress and is still the series that she is most recognized for. Since then, she has guest starred in shows such as Life with Derek as Lucy, Overruled as Rory Jablonski, as well as short films Hate, Rose, and Red Velvet Girls as well as the feature film Land of the Dead. Her most recent work includes episodes of Warehouse 13 and Flashpoint.
Lara’s most memorable work to date has been her leading role on the television series Monster Warriors. She starred as Vanka, an athletic, aggressive, overpowering girl with an interest in ancient combat and rituals. The series has aired all over the world in many different languages.
Lara has expanded her experience behind the camera working closely with Jordan Entertainment as an Associate Producer. She is eager about what the future holds for her as an actress as well as her future within Jordan Entertainment.
Filmography[edit]

Film

Year
Title
Role
Notes

2005
Hate
Doria
TV film

2005
Rose
Pari
TV film

2005
Land of the Dead
Dead Teenage Girl

2005
Red Velvet Girls
Julia
Short film

2012
Scars
Dana
Short film

Television

Year
Title
Role
Notes

2004
Radio Free Roscoe
Bridgette
3 episodes

2006–2007
Monster Warriors
Vanka
51 episodes

2007
Life with Derek
Lucy
Episode: “Two Timing Derek”

2009
Warehouse 13
Claire
Episode: “Regrets”

2009
Overruled!
Rory Jablonksky
Episode: “Worlds Collide”

2011
Flashpoint
Angela
Episode: “Terror”

External links[edit]

Lara Amersey at the Internet Movie Database

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Mavericks High Schools

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (January 2012)

Mavericks High Schools is a group of non-profit charter schools in Florida operated by Mavericks in Education, an organization headquartered in West Palm Beach, in Greater Miami.[1] Francis W. “Frank” Biden, the brother of Vice President of the United States Joe Biden, heads the chain.[2]
Schools[edit]
[1] Schools in Greater Miami

Mavericks High of North Miami-Dade County (North Miami Beach)
Mavericks High of South Miami-Dade County (Homestead)
Mavericks High of Central Broward County (Fort Lauderdale)
Mavericks High of North Broward County (Pompano Beach)
Mavericks High of Palm Beach County (Palm Springs)

Schools in Greater Orlando

Mavericks High of Osceola County (Kissimmee)

References[edit]

^ a b “Contacts.” Mavericks High Schools. Retrieved on January 16, 2012. 301 Southern Blvd West Palm Beach, FL 33405″
^ Clary, Mike. “Officials seek source of powder sent to Biden’s brother.” Sun Sentinel. October 2, 2011. Retrieved on January 16, 2012.

External links[edit]

Miami portal
Schools portal

Mavericks High Schools
Marshall, Tom. “NEW CHARTER SCHOOL PROPOSED.” St. Petersburg Times. August 14, 2008. Hernando Times 1.
Rab, Lisa. “Mavericks High Schools Hope to Profit From Education – But at What Cost?” Broward Palm Beach New Times. Thursday December 29, 2011.

This Florida school-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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캔디넷

Stade Clermontois BA

Stade Clermontois BA[1]

Founded
1938

League
Nationale masculine 1

Team history
Stade Clermontois Basket Auvergne
(1938-Present)

Based in
Clermont-Ferrand, Auvergne, France

Arena
Maison des Sports (4,630 seats)

Colors
white and red

Head coach
Guillaume Vizade

Website
[1]

Stade Clermontois Basket Auvergne is a basketball club based in Clermont-Ferrand, France that plays in the French third division.
External links[edit]

Official site

References[edit]

^ http://resultats.basketfrance.com/resultat/organisation/246E.html (French)

This article about a basketball team in France is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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도신닷컴

Capture of Berwick (1318)

See also: Capture of Berwick (1296) and Capture of Berwick (1482)

Capture of Berwick

Part of the First War of Scottish Independence

An 1873 drawing of the siege

Date
April 1318

Location
Berwick-Upon-Tweed

Result
Scottish victory

Belligerents

Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of England

Commanders and leaders

Sir James Douglas
Sir Walter Stewart
Maurice de Berkeley

Strength

Unknown
Unknown

Casualties and losses

Unknown
Unknown

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First War of
Scottish Independence

First Berwick
Dunbar
Lanark
Stirling Bridge
Falkirk
Roslin
Happrew
Stirling Castle
Methven
Dalrigh
Turnberry
Loch Ryan
Glen Trool
Loudoun Hill
Slioch
Inverurie
Buchan
Pass of Brander
Bannockburn
Moiry Pass
Connor
Kells
Skerries
Skaithmuir
Second Berwick
Faughart
Myton
Arbroath Declaration
The Great Raid of 1322
Old Byland
Corbeil Treaty
Stanhope Park
Edinburgh-Northampton Treaty

The Capture of Berwick was an event in the First War of Scottish Independence which took place in April 1318. Sir James Douglas, Lord of Douglas took the town and castle of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English, who had controlled the town since 1296.
Following the decisive Scots victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, the Scots had recovered all their strongholds, with the exception of Berwick. In September 1317, King Robert Bruce attempted a siege of Berwick, which lasted until November before he withdrew.[1] The following April, an English sergeant was bribed to allow a party of Scots to climb the town wall. The raiding party, led by Sir James Douglas, and possibly the Earl of Dunbar, took the town after a fight. The castle was warned when they lost control of their men, who began to plunder and failed to capture the castle. King Robert soon arrived with an army, and after an eleven-week siege, the castle garrison capitulated due to a lack of supplies.[2] The English burgesses were expelled, and King Robert re-established Berwick as a Scottish trading port, installing his son-in-law Walter Stewart as Keeper.[2]
The retaking of Berwick was a significant victory for the Scots. Historian Michael Brown notes that “symbolically, the capture of town and then castle marked the completion of King Robert’s realm and kingship.”[2] However, Berwick would change hands several more times in the years to come, before permanently becoming part of England when the town was captured in 1482.
References[edit]

^ Brown, p.150
^ a b c Brown, p.151

Brown, Michael (2008).
원정녀

Cyclothiazide

Cyclothiazide

Clinical data

ATC code
C03AA09 (WHO)

Legal status

Legal status

℞ (Prescription only)

Identifiers

IUPAC name

3-(bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-yl)-6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide

CAS Number
2259-96-3 Y

PubChem (CID)
2910

IUPHAR/BPS
4167

DrugBank
DB00606 N

ChemSpider
4535011 N

UNII
P71U09G5BW Y

KEGG
D01256 Y

ChEMBL
CHEMBL61593 N

ECHA InfoCard
100.017.146

Chemical and physical data

Formula
C14H16ClN3O4S2

Molar mass
389.88 g/mol

3D model (Jmol)
Interactive image

SMILES

O=S(=O)(c1c(Cl)cc2c(c1)S(=O)(=O)NC(N2)C4[C@@H]3\C=C/[C@@H](C3)C4)N

InChI

InChI=1S/C14H16ClN3O4S2/c15-10-5-11-13(6-12(10)23(16,19)20)24(21,22)18-14(17-11)9-4-7-1-2-8(9)3-7/h1-2,5-9,14,17-18H,3-4H2,(H2,16,19,20)/t7-,8+,9?,14?/m0/s1 N

Key:BOCUKUHCLICSIY-QJWLJZLASA-N N

 NY (what is this?)  (verify)

Cyclothiazide (Anhydron, Acquirel, Doburil, Fluidil, Renazide, Tensodiural, Valmiran) is a benzothiadiazide (thiazide) diuretic and antihypertensive that was originally introduced in the United States in 1963 by Eli Lilly and was subsequently also marketed in Europe and Japan.[1][2] Related drugs include diazoxide, hydrochlorothiazide, and chlorothiazide.[3]
In 1993, it was discovered that cyclothiazide is a positive allosteric modulator of the AMPA and kainate receptors, capable of reducing or essentially eliminating rapid desensitization of the former receptor, and potentiating AMPA-mediated glutamate currents by as much as 18-fold at the highest concentration tested (100 μM).[3][4][5][6] Additionally, in 2003, cyclothiazide was also found to act as a GABAA receptor negative allosteric modulator, potently inhibiting GABAA-mediated currents.[7] In animals it is a powerful convulsant, robustly enhancing epileptiform activity and inducing seizures, but without producing any apparent neuronal death.[8][9]
Cyclothiazide has been found to act as a non-competitive antagonist of the mGluR1.[10] It is selective for mGluR1 over other metabotropic glutamate receptors.[10]
Synthesis[edit]

Cyclothiazide synthesis:[11] E. Müller, K. Hasspacher, U.S. Patent 3,275,625 (1966 to Boehringer Ingelheim).

References[edit]

^ Swiss Pharmaceutical Society (2000). Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory (Book with CD-ROM). Boca Raton: Medpharm Scientific Publishers. p. 1932. ISBN 3-88763-075-0. 
^ Sittig,
입싸

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr.

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr.

Ladew and family circa 1913

Born
(1865-04-10)April 10, 1865
Shokan, New York

Died
February 16, 1940(1940-02-16) (aged 74)
LeRoy Sanitarium
Manhattan, New York City

Education
Columbia University

Known for
Fayerweather & Ladew

Partner(s)
Daniel Burton Fayerweather

Children
Joseph Harvey Ladew, Jr. (April 1904-?)
Oliver Ladew (1906-1979)

Parent(s)
Harvey Smith Ladew I (?-1888)
Rebecca Krom (?-1904)

Relatives
Edward R. Ladew, brother

Joseph Harvey Ladew, Sr. (April 10, 1865 – February 16, 1940) was one of the largest leather manufacturers in the world with Fayerweather & Ladew, and he was a yachtsman.[1][2]
Biography[edit]
He was born on April 10, 1865 to Rebecca Krom (?-1905) and Harvey Smith Ladew I (?-1888) in Shokan, New York.[3][4][5] He attended Columbia University in 1885 and left the program to join the family run Fayerweather & Ladew in Glen Cove, New York. The company was started by his brother, Edward R. Ladew in 1898.[6] He became a partner in the company on February 1, 1889.[4][7]
On November 27, 1901 he married Jennie Bennett House.[8] They had two children: Joseph Harvey Ladew, Jr. (1905-?) and Oliver Ladew (1906-1979). Ladew died on February 16, 1940 at LeRoy Sanitarium in Manhattan.[2]
Yachts[edit]
He had two yachts, both named Columbia built, the first built by Cramp Shipbuilding launched from Philadelphia on August 23, 1893.[9][10] Turned over to the United States Navy for the Spanish American War in 1898, the yacht was renamed the USS Wasp and was used in the blockade of Cuba. In 1909 the ship began a nine year long loan to the New York Naval Militia.[11] The yacht was brought back into active naval service 7 April 1917 for World War I service and continued in naval service until decommissioned at Norfolk on 1 December 1919.
In 1898 he ordered a new yacht from the Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, New Jersey for $200,000.[12] The second Columbia, constructed in 1899 and delivered 1900, was designed for possible conversion to a naval auxiliary and modeled after the United States Coast Survey steamer Pathfinder that had been built in the same shipyard.[13][14] In 1913 it was briefly impounded by the Japanese at Wakayama.[15][16] That yacht served in World War I as HMCS Stadacona.
Notes[edit]

^ The National cyclopedia of American biography. 1910. When the senior Ladew died in 1888, a brother, J. Harvey Ladew, acquired an interest in the business and became a
밤헌터

Tommy Mason-Griffin

Tommy Mason-Griffin

Free agent

Position
Point guard

Personal information

Born
(1990-09-29) September 29, 1990 (age 26)
Houston, Texas

Nationality
American

Listed height
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)

Listed weight
191 lb (87 kg)

Career information

High school
Madison (Houston, Texas)

College
Oklahoma (2009–2010)

NBA draft
2010 / Undrafted

Playing career
2010–present

Career history

2010–2011
Sioux Falls Skyforce

2011–2012
2014–2015
ratiopharm Ulm

2016
Donar Groningen

Career highlights and awards

Third-team All-Big 12 (2010)
Big 12 All-Rookie Team (2010)
McDonald’s All-American (2009)

Thomas “Tommy” Mason-Griffin (born September 29, 1990) is an American professional basketball player who last played for Donar Groningen of the Dutch Basketball League (DBL).[1] Mason-Griffin usually plays as point guard. He played college basketball for the Oklahoma Sooners.

Contents

1 Professional career

1.1 ratiopharm Ulm (2011–2015)
1.2 Donar (2016)

2 References

Professional career[edit]
ratiopharm Ulm (2011–2015)[edit]
He signed with the German team ratiopharm Ulm for the 2011–2012 season. Due to injuries, he missed the complete 2012–13 season.[2] Mason-Griffin wouldn’t play in the 2013–14 season as well. For the 2014–15 season, he returned to ratiopharm Ulm, and played 10 BBL games that season.[3]
Donar (2016)[edit]
On December 15, 2015, Mason-Griffin signed with Donar Groningen in the Netherlands.[4] On January 11, 2016, Donar and Mason-Griffin parted ways.[5] He played one game for Donar, in which he had 8 points and 6 assists.
On October 30, 2016, Mason-Griffin was selected by the Maine Red Claws with the 108th pick of the 2016 NBA Development League draft,[6] but was waived on November 9.[7]
References[edit]

^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin”. RealGM. 
^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin”. Basketball Ulm. 
^ “Tommy Mason-griffin profile”. FIBA.com. 
^ “Tommy Mason-Griffin volgt Ken Brown op bij Donar”. Basketball.nl. 
^ [1]
^ Boston, Evans (October 30, 2016). “2016 NBA D-League Draft Results”. NBA.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016. 
^ Boston, Evans (November 9, 2016). “Training Camp Cuts”. NBA.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016. 

This biographical article relating to a United States basketball player, coach, or other figure born in the 1990s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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한국야동

Minnesota State University Marching Band

Minnesota State Marching Band

School
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Location
Mankato, Minnesota

Conference
Northern Sun

Founded
1950

Director
Michael Thursby

Members
110

Fight song
“The Minnesota State Rouser”,
“Ole, Ole, Ole”,
“The Minnesota State Hymn,
“The War Song”

Uniform

              
Black and purple jacket with a splash of gold, black pants, black shakos with purple plumes, black gloves and black shoes.

Website
www.mnsu.edu/music/athleticband/

The Minnesota State Marching Band also known as The Maverick Machine is the athletic marching band of Minnesota State University, Mankato. The band generates enthusiasm and excitement by promoting school spirit and morale. The group performs at home football, hockey, and basketball events. The Maverick Machine consists of five ensembles including the marching band, the drumline, the colorguard, the pep band and the indoor winds – the first collegiate WGI winds group in Minnesota.
The group was originally formed in the 1950s as part of the transition to NCAA Divisional Athletics. During the subsequent years the group has formed and reformed based on participation and costs. The current Maverick Machine was reformed in 2014 as a result of the leadership of the current director Michael Thursby.[1]
On average the Maverick Machine plays at over 50 events for approximately 170,000 people.[2]

The Maverick Machine playing at a home football game at Blakeslee Stadium

References[edit]

^ Musolf, Nell (13 March 2015). “The Return of the Maverick Machine”. The Mankato Free Press. The Mankato Free Press. Retrieved 9 October 2016. 
^ Musolf, Nell (13 March 2015). “The Return of the Maverick Machine”. The Mankato Free Press. The Mankato Free Press. Retrieved 9 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Official website
Minnesota State Marching Band social media website

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Minnesota State University, Mankato

Athletics

Minnesota State Mavericks
Men’s Hockey
Women’s Hockey
Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference

Campus Facilities

Minnesota State University Campus
Blakeslee Stadium
Verizon Wireless Center
All Seasons Arena

University Culture

Stomper the Maverick
The Minnesota State Rouser
The Minnesota State Hymn
Minnesota State University Marching Band

Other

KMSU Campus Radio
Coach
한국야동

Rouben Melik

Rouben Melik

Born
14 November 1921
18th arrondissement of Paris

Died
21 May 2007(2007-05-21) (aged 85)

Other names
Writer

Rouben Melik (Ռուբեն Մելիք, 14 November 1921 – 21 May 2007) was a French-Armenian poet and a member of the French Resistance. Officer of Ordre des Arts et Lettres (1963).
Rouben Melik studied in Sorbonne with Gaston Bachelard, before his entrance to the literature under the aegis of the Resistance. One year after the publication in 1941 of Variations of triptyches, he joined the French Communist Party where he became a friend of Paul Eluard, alongside the Manouchian group and took part in the liberation of Paris. After the war, he founded “Armenian Youth of France” organization.
Winner of Apollinaire prize in 1948.[1]
References[edit]

^ IMEC archive

External links[edit]

Biography

This article about a poet from France is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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은꼴

Carla Robbins

Carla Robbins

Robbins at the Halifax International Security Forum 2012

Born
Carla Anne Robbins
1952/1953 (age 63–64)[1]

Nationality
American

Education
Wellesley College (B.S., 1974)
University of California, Berkeley (M.S., Ph.D.)

Occupation
Journalist

Employer
BusinessWeek (1982–?)
U.S. News & World Report (1986–1992)
The Wall Street Journal (1993–2005)
The New York Times (2006–2012)

Awards
Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting (1999, shared)
Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting (2000, shared)

Carla Robbins is an American journalist and the former deputy editorial page editor of The New York Times. Prior to her career at The New York Times, Robbins worked for BusinessWeek, U.S. News & World Report, and The Wall Street Journal. During her thirteen-year career at The Wall Street Journal, she was a member of two Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting teams.

Contents

1 Career
2 Awards
3 Notes
4 External links

Career[edit]
Robbins graduated from Wellesley College in 1974, with a bachelor’s degree in political science. She subsequently attended University of California, Berkeley, receiving master’s and doctorate degrees also in political science.[2]
In 1982, Robbins worked as an editor and, later, as a State Department reporter for BusinessWeek. In 1986, she began working as the Latin America bureau chief for U.S. News & World Report, where she later became a senior diplomatic correspondent. She left U.S. News & World Report in 1992. In 1993 she began working as a reporter and news editor at The Wall Street Journal, going on to be their lead writer on foreign policy.[2] In July 2006, she began working as an editor at The New York Times. In January 2007, she became the deputy editor of this section.[3] In July 2012, Robbins resigned from The New York Times to take time to work on a book project. It was also announced that she will consult for The New York Times on expanding their “global opinion report.”[4]
Awards[edit]
In 1984, while working at BusinessWeek, Robbins was one of the recipients of an Overseas Press Club award.[2] In 1990, she received an Nieman Fellowship from Harvard University.[5] In 2004, she shared the Elizabeth Neuffer Award for Print Journalism and the Peter R. Weitz Senior Prize.[2] In 2005, she was a Hoover Media Fellow at Stanford University.[6]
Robbins has been a member of two teams that have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize. In 1999, she and a team of reporters at The Wall Street
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